Anna,18. New Yorker. Totally in love with any and everything. From Viners to Hockey to Teen Wolf to the Olympic Swimmers

Love to Laugh. Laugh to Live. Live to Love :D

Some Of My Other Favorites Things:
Dylan O'Brien, Colton Haynes, One Direction, Olympic Swimmer's, Viners, Chicago Blackhawks, Dallas Stars <3

Life is drawing without an eraser

niccoolleeyy:

Shaka. Love. Pass it on.

niccoolleeyy:

Shaka. Love. Pass it on.

(via biancadureault)

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

(via iloniii)

olivergaskarth:

thefoxalchemist:

falloutwookie:

I feel like everyone on the internet needs to see this

Everyone in the WORLD needs to see this.

This is so important

olivergaskarth:

thefoxalchemist:

falloutwookie:

I feel like everyone on the internet needs to see this

Everyone in the WORLD needs to see this.

This is so important

(Source: mindsrebelatstagnation, via iloniii)


credit // carolagmakeup

credit // carolagmakeup

(Source: riemszaks, via teamlazy18)

jonnovstheinternet:

misspelledlife:

SLAAAAY TORONTO IM SO PROUD OF THIS

I’m starting to think Canadians are the best people ever

(Source: adteachings, via this-grasshopper)

(Source: ponylegs, via adrianuus)

mentallyfuckingonedirection:

ruinedchildhood:



IM CRYING

mentallyfuckingonedirection:

ruinedchildhood:

image

IM CRYING

(via this-grasshopper)

(Source: africant, via africant)

awwww-cute:

I reached my hand out with the intention of petting her, and what I got was the most adorable handshake I’ve ever received

awwww-cute:

I reached my hand out with the intention of petting her, and what I got was the most adorable handshake I’ve ever received

(via iloniii)

REBLOG if you are hella bored and wouldn’t mind some curious anons.

(Source: hypnotiic--baee, via iloniii)

sierracuse:

sizvideos:

Video

Literally took my breath away.

(via thanksforwatchingasifall)

thepaisleyelf:

have I talked about how my two cats love each other so much and they literally do everything together and they’re always piled all over each other like

image

image

image

image

even when they’re not sleeping they’re just hanging out 

image

(via this-grasshopper)

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

(via this-grasshopper)

(Source: evincibly, via iloniii)

(Source: shouldnt, via this-grasshopper)

ETCETERA theme by Hrrrthrrr